Wuxi (Chinese: 无锡) is an old city in southern Jiangsu province, China. The city borders two other large cities,Changzhou to the west and Suzhou to the east, and borders Zhejiang Province as well in the south. It also covers a coastline of the Yangtze River in the north and two separate coasts of Lake Tai. Wuxi is well known for being one of the birthplaces of China’s modern industry and commerce, as well as the hometown of many important businessmen who have played essential roles in building commerce in Shanghai since the early 20th century.

The modern name consists of the Chinese characters 无锡, literally translated “no tin”. According to a myth, at the time of the Warring States, soldiers were stationed in Xishan (“tin hill”) within Wuxi. While burying a pot to prepare food, a soldier found a stone plaque engraved with the words “If there is tin there is an army, there will be conflict under heaven. If there is no tin (wuxi), there will be peace under heaven,” which may be the origin of the name

According to traditional Chinese historians, two Zhou princes, Taibo and Zhongyong, founded the first Chinese state in the area of Wuxi around the 11th century BC. This state of Wu (吳) had its first capital at Meili, generally thought to be the village of Meicun in Wuxi (although some records indicate a location closer to Wu’s later capitals aroundSuzhou).  Taibo and Zhongyong helped develop Wu’s agriculture and waterways and the area soon flourished. Taibo died without an heir, and Zhongyong succeeded him as King of Wu. His descendants were later officially enfeoffed by the Zhou court as vassals before declaring themselves full kings again during the Spring and Autumn period.

A shrine to Taibo was set up in today’s Meicun. Although the original wood structure was eventually destroyed in war, it has been rebuilt several times.  A stone carved with sayings by Confucius can still be seen at the modern Taibo Shrine, whose architecture dates mostly to the Qing dynasty.

SOURCE – INTERNET AND WIKIPEDIA